Marketing Can Change Politics and the Country

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Before I begin talking about politics… let me admit my knowledge of Pakistani politics is at best “woolly”. So I am only speaking from the little to none existent political knowledge I have.

Pakistani voting patterns, to me, seem to be based on a few things:
1)    Personalities of the leaders
2)    Who was in power last time and how bad a job they did
3)    The reputation of their local candidate

A party’s manifesto is rarely at the forefront; instead the agenda is taken over by pointing to the flaws of the other parties and over promising on every issue.

Like any company a political party needs be customer orientated, they need to identify, anticipate and satisfy customer needs and this is what manifesto’s should be built upon. A party should not simply suggest they have the cure for all Pakistan’s ills if the public votes for them.

Instead it should aim to create a clear brand identity, by positioning itself not simply on the political spectrum but also in the voters mind.

At the moment much of the communication taking place is through limited formats such as personal selling, posters, speeches, media coverage and the people that drive around in the Suzuki Carry Daba’s with a giant megaphone. However their efforts seem to forget about carrying a message to persuade.


There not only needs to be more spend on communication but it needs to be far clearer. Political TV ads, a leader’s debate, direct marketing and even social networking will play a crucial role in explaining each party’s proposition and encourage voter turnout in a country where in the last elections the turnout was estimated to be a mere 45%.

People will remember what promises have been made to them and they can check them off as the Government they voted for completes them. They can then be the judge of how well the Government has performed and not be swayed by accusations from the opposition. Better political marketing will lead to better educated voters, increase the chance of re-election and encourage the Government to perform for the people and country. Or is this idea just too simplistic?

Asif is a Marketing Manager in the UK. His expertise and interests lie in Strategic Marketing, Marketing Communications, PR, Private and Public Sector Marketing, Online and Social Media Marketing. You can visit his website at www.asifafzal.com

  • http://www.asifafzal.com Asif
  • Jahanzaib Haque

    Hi Asif,

    It seems somebody is impersonating me and leaving comments on blogs. Ironically, they are using my real email address so I am informed every time they leave a post on someone’s blog. Hope that clears up the confusion; also, if you are interested in blogging for us, please do email me a submission to blog@tribune.com.pk – having written for Aurora, many-a-time I wanted to do just this piece on political advertising!

    Regards,

    Jahanzaib

  • http://www.asifafzal.com Asif

    Jahanzaib, sorry just venting.

  • http://www.argus.com.pk Ben Lawrence

    that’s a real shame man. Your response to this on the Tribune was entertaining by the way